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R


Rails

See Slot/Rails


Receiving Foot

When weight is transferred from one foot to the other, initially the CPB is centered over the Sending Foot. After movement and weight transfer the CPB will become centered over the Receiving Foot. 

Also see Foot Leads


Relative Placement Scoring System

This form of competition scoring is now used at most major swing dance competition events. The system insures that each judge has an equal vote in the final outcome. This is accomplished by adding an equal numerical value to each judges raw scores.

For a more detailed description see the Relative Placement Scoring System on the World Swing Dance Council web site.


Relevé

A relevé is a rise of the body caused by rising onto the balls of the feet (demi-pointe). This is sometimes referred to as an elevé. Also see Ballet Terms .


Resistance

Resistance refers to the amount of connection that allows information to be transferred from the CPB of one partner to the CPB of the other partner. The amount yields either an Active Connection or Passive Connection (neutral). The amount of Connection or Resistance are also referred to by some instructors as Tone. Also see: Centering/Centered, Lead & Follow


Rhythm

Music such as Swing, Salsa, Waltz, Rumba, Hustle, and all other types of music are defined by their unique rhythms. The rhythm of each specific type of music is defined by its underlying tempo, beat, pulse, accents, syncopations, etc. Also see Measure (Dance v. Music)

Elson's Music Dictionary, by Louis C. Elson, 1905, states, "Rhythm represents the regular pulsation of music."


Rhythm Dances

Remain in a small area on the dance floor.  Some examples are almost all of the Swing Dances, Night Club 2-Step, Hustle, ballroom Cha Cha, and others.  Also see Smooth Dances.


Rhythm Pattern

Is composed 2 or more Dance Measures (Rhythm Units)


Rhythm Units (AKA: Dance Measures)

The terms Rhythm Units and Dance Measures and are sometimes used interchangeably herein.

Webster's New World Dictionary, by Simon &Schuster, 1976 gives one definition of a measure to be, "a rhythmical pattern or unit." In dance we shall use the term Rhythm Unit or Dance Measure. See Measure for a more complete definition.

All of the Rhythm Unit (Dance Measure) examples defined here are 2 beats in 4/4 time. Other examples defined elsewhere are 3 beat Rhythm Units for Waltz danced in 3/4 time; and special 3 beat Rhythm Units for Hustle danced in 4/4 time (confusing huh? -- see Waltz & Hustle).

Even Rhythm Unit (Dance Measure)
(1) Leaves the same foot free
(2) Even number of weight changes (steps) within the Rhythm Unit(0,2,4,etc.)
(3) There are 2 Basic Even Rhythm Units. They are [Blank] and [Double]
Odd Rhytnm Unit (Dance Measure)
(1) Leaves the opposite foot free
(2) Odd number of weight changes (steps) within the Rhythm Unit (1,3,etc.)
(3)There are 3 Basic Odd Rhythm Units. They are [Single], [Delayed Single] and [Triple]

Also see Elements of Music, Basic Rhythm Units, Secondary Rhythm Units, Advanced Rhythm Units, Rhythm Pattern, Waltz, Hustle, Measure


For diagram definitions see
Short Hand Terms or Annotation

Straight Count Musicians Annotation

   
Count
1
e
&
a
2
e
&
a
Rhythm  
   
 

This is the "straight count" used by musicians. This musicians straight count is rarely used by dancers. Instead, the following "straight count" is commonly used by dancers.

Basic Rhythms
"Straight Count"

Blank Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
1
&
2
Rhythm
/
/

 

Double Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
1
&
2
Rhythm
X
X

 

Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
3
&
4
Rhythm
X
/

 

Delayed Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
3
&
4
Rhythm
/
X

 

Triple Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
3
&
4
Rhythm
X
x
X

For diagram definitions see
Short Hand Terms or Annotation


Basic Rhythms
"Rolling Count"

Blank Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
a
1
&
a
2
Rhythm
/
/

 

Double Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
a
1
&
a
2
Rhythm
X
X

 

Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
X
/

 

Delayed Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
/
X

 

Triple Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
X
x
X

For diagram definitions see
Short Hand Terms or Annotation


Rhythm Units for Hustle (AKA: Dance Measures)

Hustle creates an interesting conundrum. The music is in 4/4 time (4 beats to the measure), but the dance is executed to virtual 3 beat dance measures/units in 4/4 time musically -- and yet, it is not waltz. See Hustle for further description.


Rhythm Units for Waltz (AKA: Dance Measures)

Each 3 beats in waltz is a measure in 3/4 time -- consisting of 1 down-beat and 2 up-beats. The first measure is the heavy measure and the second measure is the light measure.

Basic Rhythms
"Straight Count"

   
ODD
ODD
Count
1
2
3
4
5
6
Rhythm
X
X
X
X
X
X

 

Basic Rhythms
"Rolling Count"

   
ODD
ODD
Count
&
a
1
&
a
2
&
a
3
&
a
4
&
a
5
&
a
6
Rhythm
X
X
    X
X
X
    X

 

Also see Waltz


 

Right Turn (Clockwise Turn)

Turn your Flashlight in the direction of your right shoulder.  The movement will start with the right shoulder moving Clockwise - the left shoulder will follow automatically.  It does not start with the left shoulder first.


Rise & Fall

Rise and fall is the process of elevating or lowering the CPB (center point of balance). Much of the beauty of waltz is due to the graceful rise & fall used in the dance.


Rock Step

Rock Steps can occur in any direction. The principle is that the CPB does not move all the way over the over the receiving foot before returning to be centered over the sending foot.

One example is the back Rock Step which rocks back to the ball of the receiving foot -- not to a flat foot -- and then returns in place to the sending foot (where you started from).

Straight Count

   
EVEN
Count
&
1
&
2
Rhythm
X
X
Foot
L
R
Direction
B
P
Foot Pos
4
4

For diagram definitions see
Short Hand Terms or Annotation


Rolling Count

Rolling Count or Round Count as it is sometimes referred to, in 4/4 time is [&a1 &a2] or [&a3 &a4], etc.  In 3/4 time it would be [&a1 &a2 &a3] [&a4 &a5 &a6].  Also see Count for other references. See Rolling Count Worksheet

"Rolling Count" Annotation

Blank Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
a
1
&
a
2
Rhythm
/
/

 

Double Rhythm
(Even Rhythm)

   
EVEN
Count
&
a
1
&
a
2
Rhythm
X
X

 

Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
X
/

 

Delayed Single Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
/
X

 

Triple Rhythm
(Odd Rhythm - Syncopated)

   
ODD
Count
&
a
3
&
a
4
Rhythm
X
x
X

 

For diagram definitions see
Short Hand Terms or Annotation

 


Ronde (Rond de jambe)

This involves a circling of the free foot and leg through any of several positions (around, up, down, in, out, etc.) without changing the position of the torso. There are many exercises performed under the title Rond de Jambe -- the most basic of which is moving the leg in a semicircle with the free foot brushing the floor or slightly above the floor. Also see Ballet Terms .


 

Round Count

This is the same as Rolling Count.  Also see Count for other references.


 

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